End of the shawl aversion?

There has always been something that’s puzzled me about knitters/Ravelry…the insane predilection they seem to have for knitting shawls.

 

I have never worn a shawl. I don’t know many people who do. I thought they were frumpy and about as useful as a chocolate teapot to be honest.

 

But in recent months I’ve found myself admiring certain shawls more and more…even adding them to my favourites (shock!). Here are some of my recent picks…

Drachenfels by Melanie Berg on Ravelry – I love the colours and stripes – I can even forgive it for being a triangle!

 

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Claire’s Shawl Wrap by Handsty on Etsy – This looks sooooo cosy and fabulous.

 

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And Textured Laguna Wrap by Chandi Agee on Ravelry – this is such a beautiful colour and texture.

 

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I’ve also realised that a shawl is a fine thing to sit and wrap yourself in when it’s not wintery anymore but there’s still a wee nip in the air.

 

I’m still not convinced by the floaty, lacy, triangular/crescent/scalloped edge things that a lot of ravellers seem to lap up…but I am officially coming out as a shawl fan.

 

Confession: I have actually knit a shawl/wrap type thing and am sitting cosily wrapped in it as I type…more of that another day!

 

Magical magic loop

I thought I would write up a quick explanation of how to knit using the magic loop method. This lets you knit smaller circumference projects like socks, gloves or mittens in the round without using double pointed needles (dpns). Instead you use a circular needle and manipulate the stitches on the cable to enable you to knit around.

 

I much prefer using magic loop to dpns as I find it easier and quicker to knit this way and I get less ‘laddering’ which I could never get rid of when using dpns.

 

Here’s how to do it:

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Cast on the amount of stitches you need and push them down onto the cable.
Find the halfway point of your stitches and pull the cable between the stitches at this point.
Find the halfway point of your stitches and pull the cable between the stitches at this point to form a loop.
Slide both sets of stitches onto both needles. With the needles facing right the working yarn will be attached to the back set of stitches.
Slide both sets of stitches onto both needles. With the needles facing right the working yarn will be attached to the back set of stitches.

Pull the needle holding the back set of stitches until they slide onto the cable.

Pull the needle holding the back set of stitches until they slide onto the cable.

Making sure the stitches don't twist, use the freed back needle to knit the stitches on the front needle.
Making sure the stitches don’t twist, use the freed back needle to knit the stitches on the front needle.

Once this half of the round is knit, slide the second set of stitches onto the free needle and the first set off the other needle and knit these in the same way. You have completed one round.

Keep knitting round, slipping the next set of stitches onto the left needle when you have finished knitting the previous set.

Try it, it’s not as complicated as it looks!

Happy magic looping…