Yes, I know it’s summer, but I have been knitting a scarf…

…I did start it in the winter though. So if you fancy trying to knit this scarf and you’re anything like me, you might want to start it now!

 

I have been a bit obsessed with reverse stocking stitch stripes recently, ever since I was almost finished this scarf (with the ‘right’ side out) and decided it looked better with the ‘wrong’ side out. Now I’m pretty much knitting everything in reverse stocking stitch stripes. Don’t worry, it will pass once I’ve found a new obsession, much like my obsession with welts (though I still love a welt).

 

Pictures!

 

 

Pattern!

 

You will need: 3 X 50g in white, 2 X 50g in blue and 1 X 50g in orange. Or any other colour combo you like. I used DMC Woolly in shades 01 (white) and 102 (orange) and Sublime Extra Fine Merino in shade 363 (indigo) for the blue. These are all DK weight, you can use any yarn you choose although different weights will result in a different size scarf of course. Mine is 240cm long (excluding fringe) and 16cm wide.

You will also need a 4.5mm (US 7) circular needle (or whatever size suits your yarn weight) and knowledge of magic loop as this scarf is knitted in the round. See my tutorial here if you are not sure how to do magic loop. You will also need a smallish crochet hook for the fringes.

Note: As the whole thing is reverse stocking stitch you can just knit it the usual way (knitting every round), with the ‘knit’ stitches facing outwards and the ‘purl’ stitches on the inside, then turn it inside out at the end. For this pattern, I’ve called the ‘knit’ stitches the ‘wrong’ side and the ‘purl’ stitches the ‘right’ side. Just make sure you leave your yarn ends on the outside or ‘wrong’ side as you go.

Cast on 72 sts in your blue yarn.

Join in the round.

(Knit every round.)

Knit one round in blue.

Switch to white, knit one round.

Continue working the last two rounds until the blue yarn runs out.

After the next white round, switch to orange.

Continue in the same manner until you have a few yards of orange and white left (enough for a fringe).

Cast off.

Secure your ends, making sure they are all on the ‘wrong’ stocking stitch side – you don’t need to worry too much about weaving them in as they will be on the inside of the tube. Then turn your tube ‘right’ side out.

Make an orange and a white fringe. I like to use a greeting card – wrap the yarn around the card right along it’s length, cut the yarn at the opening side of the card, you then have even lengths for fringe making.

Close the ends of the tube with your fringes, orange on the blue end and white on the orange end (or you could do blue on the orange end if you prefer and have some left). Using a crochet hook, poke it through both sides of the tube between the first and second round. Grab the loops of two bits of yarn folded in the middle. Pull the loops through and then pull the ends of the yarn through the loop and tighten. Make one fringe loop every other stitch or it will stretch out your scarf end.

You are finished and can now flounce around in your scarf. Then take it off, block it like a proper knitter and flounce around again.

Ta da!

 

Advertisements

Magical magic loop

I thought I would write up a quick explanation of how to knit using the magic loop method. This lets you knit smaller circumference projects like socks, gloves or mittens in the round without using double pointed needles (dpns). Instead you use a circular needle and manipulate the stitches on the cable to enable you to knit around.

 

I much prefer using magic loop to dpns as I find it easier and quicker to knit this way and I get less ‘laddering’ which I could never get rid of when using dpns.

 

Here’s how to do it:

DSC_0667
Cast on the amount of stitches you need and push them down onto the cable.
Find the halfway point of your stitches and pull the cable between the stitches at this point.
Find the halfway point of your stitches and pull the cable between the stitches at this point to form a loop.
Slide both sets of stitches onto both needles. With the needles facing right the working yarn will be attached to the back set of stitches.
Slide both sets of stitches onto both needles. With the needles facing right the working yarn will be attached to the back set of stitches.

Pull the needle holding the back set of stitches until they slide onto the cable.

Pull the needle holding the back set of stitches until they slide onto the cable.

Making sure the stitches don't twist, use the freed back needle to knit the stitches on the front needle.
Making sure the stitches don’t twist, use the freed back needle to knit the stitches on the front needle.

Once this half of the round is knit, slide the second set of stitches onto the free needle and the first set off the other needle and knit these in the same way. You have completed one round.

Keep knitting round, slipping the next set of stitches onto the left needle when you have finished knitting the previous set.

Try it, it’s not as complicated as it looks!

Happy magic looping…